The Brahmanda Purana: 5 Volumes

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Preface

 

Part I

The present volume contains the Brahmat1da Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

This Purana, like all other Purãnas, is encyclopedic in character. It deals with miscellaneous topics such as Cosmogony, Religion, Philosophy History, Geography and Astronomy. It is called Brahmanda since it gives explanation of the real state of affairs about the universe. It is divided into four sections Prakriya, Anusanga, Upodghata and Upasarithara. It is accompanied by LalitcY-Mahatmya (the glorification of the Goddess Lalita) in 40 chapters.

The present volume consists of two Sections viz. Prakriya and Anusanga. Section 1 Prakriya consists of five chapters which deal with the creation of the universe in the light of the Vedic metaphysics which it expounds in detail in the Purãnic manner. This section describes the original state of equilibrium of gunas (qualities), the laying of the Golden Egg, the emergence of the creator lord Brahma from it. The second section Anasanga, which this volume includes, contains 33 chapters (6-38). It is a connected continuation of the theme of Prakriya pada inasmuch as it recounts the account of the birth as well as the genealogies of Brahmarsis (Brahmanical sages), Devaris (Celestial sages) and Rajanis (Royal sages). The two sections which complete this volume illustrate the two characteristics of a Mah4urasia viz., Sarga (Creation) and Vathia (genealogy), although the latter trait is resumed in the third section, namely the Upodghata of the next volume.

The aim of this series is to universalize knowledge through the most popular international medium of expression namely English. Old Sanskrit text has been rendered into English as precisely as possible. The translation is based on the standard edition of the Venkatesvara press. The test is well edited still it presents problems hard to be overcome by mere translation. The need of annotations is evident therefore. The learned translator has added ample materials in the footnotes which facilitate correct interpretation of the text. He has put elaborate comments in these notes on each and every problem of importance and discussed textual variations in the verses common in the preface. The comparative study of the Javanese text of Brahmanda Purana in Kavi Language with the Sanskrit text of the present Purana is a feature that shall be most welcomed by the reader.

We have included abbreviation in this part. They will be repeated in the succeeding parts too with such additions as are made in the notes of those parts. The General index will be appended to the last part.

 

Preface

 

Part II

The present volume contains the Brahmanda Purana, Part II (Chapters 1-43) of the third section, Upodghatapada, of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-third volume in the Series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lala Sundar Lal Jain of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty two volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata Garuda, Narada, Kurma and Brahmanda Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

The text of this Purana is divided into 3 parts The preliminary (purva), the middle (madhya) and the concluding (uttara). The preliminary part consists of two sections namely Prakriya and Anutanga. The former consists of 5 chapters, the latter contains 33. The chapter Nos. of the 2 sections run serially. The middle part consists of section 3 named Upodghata. The serial nos. of chs. in this section start afresh with the nun- her I and end with the number 74. The final part (Uttarabhaga) consists of Section 4 named Upasamhara consisting of 4 chapters and an appendix named Lalitamshatmya (the Glorification of the Goddess Lalita) in 40 chapters. In this part too, the serial order of chapters begins with the fresh number. The division into parts—Pürva, Madhyama and Uttara—seems to be arbitrary. For instance, the middle part, though it start€ with the fresh number of chapters, continues the topic of the previous part right up to the chapter 8 of this pada.

The present volume contains the third section Upodghata (Chs. 1 to 43). The remaining cbs (44-74) of this section are treated in the next volume. Thus the third section Upodghdta has been split into 2 volumes. Chapters 1-10 of this section deal with the groups of sages such as Bhrgu, Angiras, Atri, and their progeny as well as the creation of Prajapatis and the race of Danu and others. Ch. 10 takes up additionally, the Dynasties of Pitrs, their propitiation by performing Sraddha. The Sraddha Kalpa consists of 11 chapters beginning with the 10th chapter and ending with the chapter 20. It states why Brahmanas are to be worshipped fed and gifted at the time of Sraddha and endorses the belief that pitrs enter the bodies of Brahmins in gaseous form. It describes the sraddha ritual in detail and provides the philosophical background thereof. Ch. 21 onwards deal with the narrative of Bhargava Parasurama and depict the history of Haihaya king Karittavirya known as Sahasrarjuna Chs. 32, 33 are very important as they depict the religious condition of the period when different sects of Indian religion had reached a compromise Brahma’s sending Parasurama to Siva to receive the knowledge of weaponty Siva’s granting parasurama the perfect missile effective of world conquest as well as the protective armour and 108 names o lord Krsna are the instances in point. Another remarkable feature of this section is the reference to Mrtasamjivani lore that revives the dead to life and which Bhrgu is said to possess.

We have included abbreviation in this part. They will be repeated in the succeeding parts too with such additions as are made in the notes of those parts. The General index will be appended to the last part.

 

Preface

 

Part III

The present volume contains the Brahmanda Purana, Part II (Chapters 1-43) of the third section, Upodghatapada, of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-third volume in the Series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lala Sundar Lal Jain of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty two volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata Garuda, Narada, Kurma and Brahmanda Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

The present Volume continues the story of Parasuráma from the previous volume. It records the visit of Parasurama to the hermitage of his father Jamadagni and his review of the battle with king Kirttavirya ending in the latter’s death, his visit to lord Brahmã who advised him to see lord Siva who gave him the protective mantra Trailokya-Vijaya which he repeated for practice at the holy place named Puskara.

In the next visit to lord Siva Parasurama meets stiff resistance from Vinayaka, son of lord Siva. Vinayaka as a guard is posted at the gate. He would not allow Paraurama to enter the palace at that unusual hour. But in the excess of devotion for the lord, Paraurama can no longer wait and a furious combat ensues between Vinayaka


Item Code: IDF069
Cover: Hardcover
Publisher: Motilal Banarsidass Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
ISBN: Vol I 812080354X  |  Vol II 8120803558  |  Vol III 8120803566  |  Vol IV 8120803574  |  Vol V 8120803582  | 
Language: English Translation
Size: 8.8" X 5.7"
Pages: 1548
Other Details: Weight of the Book: 2.360 Kg